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Wind farm boost north of Horsham

BIG WIND: RES  Australia Murra Warra Wind Farm project manager Kevin Garthwaite at the proposed home of a major renewable energy plant between Horsham and Warracknabeal. Picture: DEAN LAWSON

BIG WIND: RES Australia Murra Warra Wind Farm project manager Kevin Garthwaite at the proposed home of a major renewable energy plant between Horsham and Warracknabeal. Picture: DEAN LAWSON

By DEAN LAWSON
Leaders of a project involved in constructing up to 117 wind-energy turbines north of Horsham are urging the community to attend public information sessions next week.
Developer RES Australia wants people to ask questions, find out more and have their say at exhibitions in Horsham Town Hall and Sailors Home Hall on Monday, and Warracknabeal on Tuesday.
RES Australia, already building a $450-million Ararat Wind Farm, has spent seven years collecting wind-related data from meteorological masts at a Murra Warra site and is now finalising details from extensive array of impact studies.
It hopes to submit a planning application for the $650-million to $700-million project to Planning Minister Richard Wynne in June.
Project manager Kevin Garthwaite took The Weekly Advertiser on a tour of the area where the turbines and a sub-station would feed enough energy into the power network to power 212,000 Victorian houses a year.
With the trademark wind of the Kalkee plains blowing across the flat expanse of broadacre farmland, Mr Garthwaite explained that each of the turbines would measure up to 220 metres from the ground to the tip of the blades, the equivalent height of the nearby Dooen radio mast.
He said each blade would measure 66 metres across an overall span of 136 metres. Each nacelle housing a generator at the top of 140-metre masts will be about the size of large shipping containers.
“The increasing height and size of the turbines is becoming quite standard with the development of wind technology,” he said.
“We’ve heavily assessed this area and it is ideal for a wind farm of this scale. We’ve been collecting wind data at various levels every 10 minutes and found, based on our experience, that it is highly suitable. There is a low population, the land has already been highly modified and the wind farm will only have a two percent footprint on the land it occupies.”

For full story, see the February 24, 2016 edition of The Weekly Advertiser.
READ IT ONLINE HERE!

Short URL: http://www.theweeklyadvertiser.com.au/?p=31946

Posted on Feb 24 2016

Posted by on Feb 24 2016. Filed under Environment, FEATURED, News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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