The Weekly Advertiser

Southern Aurora on show

Lyn McKenzie, Stawell, The show happened about 8pm Friday night (April 20) and was nearly the biggest one I have seen here. The arc was clearly visible to the naked eye. The beams did not last very long and I couldn’t see them naked eye. The last huge aurora I saw was in August 2015 and I could see the whole lot dancing very clearly. This one was very different though with the beams centred on the left half only. For technical purposes this was apparently moderate G2 geomagnetic storm conditions which is high, with a K value of 8 which is very high as well. Tasmania saw another arc underneath this one with the red beams in between. We get the higher portion being up so high.NIGHT’S SPLENDOUR: What happens when particles charged by the sun collide with atoms in the earth’s atmosphere? They energise electrons in the atoms that ultimately release photons. Or, put simply, they create a light show of various colours and complexity in the sky we know as auroras. People living closer to the poles get to see auroras more than others, but occasionally the phenomenon is visible in inland Australia. A significant Southern Aurora, Aurora Australis, occurred on April 20 and photographer Lyn McKenzie of Stawell captured its magnificence unfolding west of the Wimmera centre. “It was nearly the biggest one I have seen here. The arc was clearly visible to the naked eye,” she said.

The entire April 26, 2018 edition of The Weekly Advertiser is available online. READ IT HERE!


The entire April 26, 2018 edition of AgLife is available online. READ IT HERE!


Short URL: http://www.theweeklyadvertiser.com.au/?p=60006

Posted on Apr 26 2018

Posted by on Apr 26 2018. Filed under Arts Entertainment, Environment, FEATURED. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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